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English Bulletin "MakingIt"

English Bulletin "MakingIt"

“Makingit” is a the digital quarterly official magazine periodically issued by UNIDO Headquarters in English. It can be downloaded as a web-magazine.

A quarterly magazine "MakingIt Industry for Development N.24"

A quarterly magazine “MakingIt Industry for Development N.24”

As UN-Habitat’s Joan Clos says in his interview in this issue, “Urbanization and industrialization are two transformative processes for wealth generation.” For several centuries, industrialization has been a key driver of urban development.

The complementarity between urbanization and industrialization is set to take on a new dynamic with the unfolding of the Belt and Road Initiative (BRI). Launched in 2013, the BRI involves China underwriting billions of dollars of infrastructure investment in countries along the old Silk Road routes linking it with Europe and Africa. The BRI is likely to provide ample opportunities for industrial growth within the context of urban development.

How will cities along the Belt and Road forge an inclusive and sustainable urban-industrial development? This issue of Making It looks at the challenges arising when industry meets the city in the era of the Belt and Road Initiative.

This issue features;

  • Cities of the Silk Roads: past, present and future, Peter Fankopan sees the Belt and Road Initiative as the latest in a long line of similar projects across similar regions, and looks for the lessons that history can reveal
  • The undeniable relationship between urbanization and industrialization – interview with Joan Clos (UN-Habitat)
  • China aims to build a global infrastructure network, Belt and Road infrastructure projects, planned and completed (March 2017)

 

A quarterly magazine "MakingIt Industry for Development N.23"

A quarterly magazine “MakingIt Industry for Development N.23”

In today’s interdependent global economy, Africa remains a weak link. If the world is to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals, thereby completing the United Nations 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, it must help Africa accelerate its development by promoting rapid and responsible industrialization.

To fulfill its economic potential, Africa must industrialize. The importance of this has been stressed repeatedly at recent international forums, including the Sixth Tokyo International Conference on African Development (TICAD VI), and the G20 summit in Hangzhou, China.

This issue features;

  • Lessons learnt: How can the Third Industrial Decade for Africa be different from the first two? asks Charles Arthur
  • The future of my Africa: Youth can drive the green industrialization of the continent, says Musopa Kalenga
  • Lights, power, action: Kofi A. Annan, Chair of the Africa Progress Panel, on electrifying Africa

A quarterly magazine "MakingIt Industry for Development N.22"

A quarterly magazine “MakingIt Industry for Development N.22”

This special issue of MakingIt marks the 50th anniversary of the United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO).

The date of 17November 1966, when theGeneralAssembly set up UNIDO as an autonomous body within the United Nations with amission to promote and accelerate the industrialization of the developing countries, marks its official birthday.

A quarterly magazine "MakingIt Industry for Development N.21"

A quarterly magazine “MakingIt Industry for Development N.21”

The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and its Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) mark a radical change in the way the world addresses the many serious development challenges it faces.

We at the UNIDO believe that the path to sustainable development is through inclusive and sustainable industrialization. We know from economic history, policy, and practice that industrialization is the indispensable ingredient of sustained growth, with long-lasting and widely-shared social benefits.

 

A quarterly magazine "MakingIt Industry for Development N.20"

A quarterly magazine “MakingIt Industry for Development N.20”

Steady prosperity has not been achieved throughout the world and there remain remarkable differences between and within regions, countries and societies.

Growth in the past has occurred too often without providing the opportunity of participation and reward to significant segments of the population, and women and youth in particular.

 

A quarterly magazine "MakingIt Industry for Development N.19"

A quarterly magazine “MakingIt Industry for Development N.19”

A water footprint shows the amount of fresh water used to produce the goods and services we consume, including that used for growing, harvesting, packaging and shipping. The global average water footprint of industrial products is 80 litres per US dollar of the purchasing price.

More than 2.8 billion people in 48 countries will face water stress or scarcity conditions by 2025, yet at the same time global water demand for manufacturing is expected to massively increase.

For industrialization to be sustainable, it must be a process that reduces water use and improves the quality of wastewater. The greening of industry can help ensure safe and clean water for all.

A quarterly magazine "MakingIt Industry for Development N.18"

A quarterly magazine “MakingIt Industry for Development N.18”

Today, with half of the population of the world living in cities and the rate of urbanization ever-increasing, cities occupy a special position in the global development agenda.
An expanding population with higher expectations will require innovative solutions to the questions of how industry can be greened, public infrastructure improved, and social services made available to all.

A quarterly magazine "MakingIt Industry for Development N.17"

A quarterly magazine “MakingIt Industry for Development N.17”

What is the potential of small island developing states to pursue sustainable development by raising economic productivity?
As a follow-up to the United Nations Third International Conference on Small Island Developing States, held in Samoa in September 2014, this issue of Making It takes a look at the SIDS’ potential to pursue sustainable economic development through steadily raising economic productivity.

A quarterly magazine "MakingIt Industry for Development N.16"

A quarterly magazine “MakingIt Industry for Development N.16”

It is clear that the world must devise and adopt a sustainable development model and quickly transition to a low-carbon economy. But how are we going to implement a truly sustainable development approach on a global scale? And how are we going to pay for this great transformation?

A quarterly magazine "MakingIt Industry for Development N.15"

A quarterly magazine “MakingIt Industry for Development N.15”

Industry is back! Manufacturing and entrepreneurship are now recognized as the key drivers to create the growth rates, jobs and economic structures needed to eradicate poverty and provide sustainable livelihoods for all. Industrial policy – government policies directed at affecting the economic structure of the economy – is firmly back on the agenda in countries around the world and at all stages of development.

A quarterly magazine "MakingIt Industry for Development N.14"

A quarterly magazine “MakingIt Industry for Development N.14”

Despite being a diverse group by size, population and income level, the middle-income countries share a number of key common challenges to development and some of these are explored by the contributors to this issue.

A quarterly magazine "MakingIt Industry for Development N.13"

A quarterly magazine “MakingIt Industry for Development N.13”

According to a leader published in The Economist in February 1999, “innovation has become the industrial religion of the late 20th century.” The leader continued, “Business sees it as the key to increasing profits and market share. Governments automatically reach for it when trying to fix the economy.” Since then, the relevance and importance of innovation has grown still further. Over the past two decades, it has become clear that it has a pivotal role in development. The build-up of innovation capacities has played, and continues to play, a central role in the growth dynamics of successful developing countries.

A quarterly magazine "MakingIt Industry for Development N.12"

A quarterly magazine “MakingIt Industry for Development N.12”

South-South cooperation is a broad framework for collaboration and the exchange of resources, technology, skills and knowledge between countries of the Global South. South-South cooperation can achieve results on the ground, in ways that traditional development assistance may not, because of countries’ geographical proximity, cultural and historical ties, or similar development paths. Countries that have paved the way for their own development in the last decade or two have much to share, especially in terms of expertise and experience, with those currently facing similar challenges.

A quarterly magazine "MakingIt Industry for Development N.11"

A quarterly magazine “MakingIt Industry for Development N.11”

The creation of opportunities for young people to find employment in productive activities is essential for the stability and well-being of our societies. Youth need meaningful, decent jobs for their own personal development and to stimulate sustainable economic development. Many young people in the developing world face little prospect of obtaining a job in the formal sector and, for many, self-employment is the only option. By earning a living through entrepreneurship, young people can make a crucial contribution to poverty reduction. Youth entrepreneurship is a key tool to develop the human capital necessary for the future, to unleash the economic potential of youth, and promote sustainable growth. Innovation and economic growth will depend on future leaders with entrepreneurial skills and attitudes.

A quarterly magazine "MakingIt Industry for Development N.10"

A quarterly magazine “MakingIt Industry for Development N.10”

In terms of international development, it is often taken for granted that wealth inevitably leads to health, and that therefore only the countries with wealthier economies will be able to foster the conditions for a healthier population. In this context, international development efforts usually focus on interventions to kick-start economic growth, on the assumption that economic success will help eradicate sickness and disease. But what if the paradigm is flipped, and healthy populations become a building block for healthy economies? As well as The Wealth of Nations – the title of Adam Smith’s ‘free market bible’ – should we perhaps also be talking about the ‘health of nations’?

A quarterly magazine "MakingIt Industry for Development N.9"

A quarterly magazine “MakingIt Industry for Development N.9”

Imagine a future where the power of green technology drives a new economic revolution, and where everyone, all over the world, has access to clean, safe, and affordable energy services. Does this sound far-fetched? Not according to our contributors.

A quarterly magazine "MakingIt Industry for Development N.8"

A quarterly magazine “MakingIt Industry for Development N.8”

‘Women hold up half the sky’ is a Chinese proverb affirming women’s equal contribution to the human experience but it is an aspirational, rather than a factual, claim. In developed and developing countries alike, gender gaps persist in education, health, work, wages and political participation.

A quarterly magazine "MakingIt Industry for Development N.7"

A quarterly magazine “MakingIt Industry for Development N.7”

We clearly live in a multi-polar world. It is no longer possible to isolate the complex risks and fragilities that we face, nor is it possible to find national solutions to global challenges. They require a diversified and multi-polar response. As we stand at a crossroads of global policy and governance, this issue of Making It: Industry for Development offers a selection of some of the best contributions to the growing debate.

A quarterly magazine "MakingIt Industry for Development N.6"

A quarterly magazine “MakingIt Industry for Development N.6”

This issue of Making It: Industry for Development looks at some aspects of the broad concept of agribusiness, often defined as the whole range of business activities that are performed from farm to fork, but also including the processing of raw materials for the production of many non-food items, such as textiles, paper and biofuel.